Missoula County opens search for new elections administrator after Causby’s departure

Missoula County elections administrator Dayna Causby left the job last week after two years. The county has begun a search for her replacement. (Martin Kidston/Missoula Current file photo)

After two years on the job and overseeing a ballot recount in a municipal race, Missoula County’s elections administrator is heading home for what she described as family reasons.

Dayna Causby, originally of North Carolina, ended her tenure on Dec. 27, marking the second administrator to leave the job in as many years.

“This was an extremely difficult decision for me, as my time with Missoula County has been a tremendously positive experience,” Causby said in a statement provided by the county. “I have great confidence in the management team’s vision and strategy for elections in Missoula County.”

Causby’s departure came as a surprise and wasn’t announced publicly until after her last day. She made no mention of her plans to leave the post during the General Election in November, nor the recount that follow two weeks later to settle a local municipal race.

The county hired Causby in 2018 after fielding a list of 40 applicants to replace Rebecca Connors, who left the post to move back to Helena. The 40 applicants were narrowed to three, which included Bradley Seaman.

Seaman current serves as the election supervisor and will serve as interim administrator starting next week. He started as a polling place manager in Missoula in 2008.

“Missoula County is conducting a nationwide search to fill the commissioner-appointed role,” the county said Monday. “The position opened for recruitment earlier this month, and commissioners hope to interview finalists the week of Feb. 25 and announce the selected candidate in early March.”

Six years years ago, Missoula County placed the job of running elections in the hands of an appointed official as opposed to an elected clerk and record.

Commissioners believed the current structure protects the job from partisan politics, allowing it to focus instead on the needs of voters.