Radio RSS

Harmon’s Histories: Waxing nostalgic about the early days of radio broadcasting
Harmon’s Histories: Waxing nostalgic about the early days of radio broadcasting
Harmon’s Histories: Waxing nostalgic about the early days of radio broadcasting
In December 1923, Waldemar Kaempffert, a “noted technical expert,” described the transition from the “the first timid experiments” with radio signals to the birth of the “broadcasting business.” That business created a whole new language and job descriptions. There were terms like “Broadcast Studio,” “Power Room” and “Master Clock,” and job titles like “Director of Broadcasting,” “Power Man” and “Announcer.”
Harmon’s Histories: Happy New Year! Keep that window cracked open at night!
Harmon’s Histories: Happy New Year! Keep that window cracked open at night!
Harmon’s Histories: Happy New Year! Keep that window cracked open at night!
Happy New Year! As we all hope 2024 will be a better year than 2023, we look back at similar hopes 100 years ago. The editor of The Madisonian newspaper (Virginia City) at the end of 1923 wrote: “The old year fades away and the God of time ushers in the infant of 1924. The years come, and they go, and are seen no more, but they leave a heritage that even time itself can not efface.”
Harmon’s Histories: PINK in 2024? Or Carpenters, Elvin Bishop, Buck Owens in 1973?
Harmon’s Histories: PINK in 2024? Or Carpenters, Elvin Bishop, Buck Owens in 1973?
Harmon’s Histories: PINK in 2024? Or Carpenters, Elvin Bishop, Buck Owens in 1973?
I see that P!NK will perform in Missoula at Washington-Grizzly Stadium in August, with Sheryl Crow among the warm-up acts. Ticket prices, according to various websites, range between $70 and $370. That prompted me to look back through old issues of the UM student newspaper, The Kaimin, for the various acts and ticket prices in Missoula 50 years ago: 1973. Wow! What a year!
Harmon’s Histories: In final class, UM’s Toole warned of corporate greed, rapacious development
Harmon’s Histories: In final class, UM’s Toole warned of corporate greed, rapacious development
Harmon’s Histories: In final class, UM’s Toole warned of corporate greed, rapacious development
“There are, I think, undeniably, new winds sweeping across America. They are indeed gusty and changeable, but they are new - and they will alter what happens in Montana ... (either for) better or worse, (depending) on Montanans and how they, or you, read those winds.” The quote is from one of my favorite historians, K. Ross Toole, a Montana rancher who accepted the Hammond Professorship at the University of Montana in 1965 – a post he held until his death in 1981.

Load More Articles